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Print Facts #1: Submitting (Offset) Print Ready Artwork

Print Facts - Use info for designing presentation materials

Submitting Print Ready Artwork

These days, a lot of graphic designers are working more with digital formats than offset printing. An offset press offers opportunities that you don’t get in digital yet – from PMS colors to a richer, deeper quality. Think digital photos vs. film if you remember back that far.

In order to ensure your project turns out just like you’ve envisioned it is important that your files are set up correctly for print. While our Prepress Department reviews your files, it makes the process much smoother if they have been set up correctly. So let’s start with the basics!

What is Print-Ready?

creating print ready art

print ready artwork for offset presses

If timing is critical

Make sure you have discussed turnaround times before starting your project and plan your project milestones accordingly so that you can keep everything on schedule. Jobs schedule based on proof approval, so if time is tight and there is a typo… Whoops! Missing your deadline could mean that your run can’t go ahead until the press schedule has an opening. Also, you don’t want to incur any rush charges if they could have been avoided.

Print size matters

One of the most common mistakes made when printing is sending a document that is not high image quality, which, if not corrected before the final run, can result in a printout that is fuzzy and lacking in clarity due to a lack of resolution. It’s important that you create your document the same size. Designing at actual size reduces the margin for error with graphics, fonts and layout once printed. Remember that just because something looks great on your screen could become a disaster when printed in the large format, for which it was intended.

Proof your document thoroughly

Allow yourself plenty of time to thoroughly proof your document for any typographical, punctuation and grammatical errors. One of the easiest ways to review is to print out a copy so you can thoroughly read through it all. Also, if you wrote it, have at least one other person read it over. Really.

Print out a proof to see your artwork

Printing out a proof allows you to see how everything looks when printed. Even though it won’t be to size, it is also a good idea to fold up the proof to mimic your product. It allows you to see ahead of time that everything is laid out correctly, reads the right way, and nothing falls off the print area.

All this will give you a good start in creating that 3 ring binder, pocket folder, box or packaging that your clients need.

Contact Corporate Image to get started. Our staff have the knowledge that can help you get the outstanding presentation product you need and make the process as easy as possible!


Using Digital and Offset Printing to the Best Advantage

 Working on a printed presentation piece and wondering if you should go digital or offset (litho) printing?

This info graphic (found here) helps explain the basics of it.

Corporate Image offers both offset and digital printing depending on the job. Our team will work with you to determine what will work best for your job, but it is good to have the information for working with your clients. Offset or litho printing offers higher quality, but digital printing has been catching up quickly. There are a few things digital just can’t do (yet) that make offset printing a real stand out option. The long and short of it is:

When to use Offset Printing:

  • Big job
  • Specific PMS
  • Metallic inks
  • Spot Varnish or UV

When to use Digital Printing:

  • Shorter runs
  • 4 color process
  • Variable data

Be aware that both this and the info-graphic are not complete so talk to us about what you need (our people are well versed in the subtle strengths and weaknesses of each.)

 

digital vs. offset printing explained

 

Not sure what you need for your project? Call us and we can help!


Offset vs. Digital Printing: Using them to their best advantage

 Working on a printed presentation piece and wondering if you should go digital or offset (litho) printing?

This info graphic (found here) helps explain the basics of it.

Offset or litho printing still offers higher quality, but digital printing has been catching up quickly. There are a few things digital just can’t do (yet) that make offset printing a real stand out option.

The long and short of it is: big job and specific PMS or metallic inks?  Offset.  Short run and 4 color process? Digital. Be aware that both this and the info-graphic are not complete so talk to your printer about what you need (our people are well versed in the subtle strengths and weaknesses of each.)

 

digital vs. offset printing explained

 

Remember, if you are on the fence about which way to go with your printing, call us and we can work with you to get everything you want!


Explaining CMYK, PMS and RGB for web and printing

What are the differences in color profiles for print and the web?

Boy are we happy you asked.

Print:

CMYK (Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, Black), or four color process, is a subtractive color model, meaning if you add together CMY you should get black.  Color mixes being what they are, Black was added to make sure a true black could get printed.

Web: 

RGB (Red, Green, Blue) is a additive color process generally used for digital devices and internet.  This works on the same principle of mixing light in which a mix of red, green and blue gives you…white.  Try that with ink.

PMS

PMS colors offer you a way to match exact print colors- since slight variations in mix on press can change a color.  Lets say your have a VERY specific corporate color in your logo.  CMYK will come very close, but if you want to be exact, you probably want to run the PMS color as a spot color.  You can specify PMS for digital use, but it will get translated to RGB.

The logocompany.net put out this great info-graphic and we thought you should take a look:

PMS, CYMK and PMS spot colors explained! Corporate Image

Don’t you feel informed?  Thanks Logo Company!


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