REQUEST:

Eco Friendly Marketing Materials: Paperboy Wine Bottles

Eco Friendly marketing materials - paperboy Wine Bottles

Paperboy wines are packaged in a unique molded paper ‘bottle’ with a  plastic bladder inside to hold the wine. The paper wrapper is easily recyclable (though they do not say the bladder is).

While glass is completely recyclable most glass doesn’t get recycled for some reason and these paper and plastic bottles have the added benefit of being a lot lighter, saving in cost and fuel to ship, and making it easier to carry around. Now to be quite honest, I would still balk at carrying something like this into the back country (at 1.9 lbs it weighs a bit too much for me), but I am very tempted to go get a bottle to bring to a friends house.

via Packaging World:

Innovative packaging designed to meet consumers’ lifestyle choices—that is the vision that inspires Healdsburg, CA-based wine company Truett-Hurst, Inc. In late 2012, the super- and ultra-premium wine producer introduced a new range of wines targeted at specific buying occasions—for example, barbecues, birthdays, and anniversaries—packaged in bottles with exquisitely designed full-body paper wraps.

Now, Truett-Hurst tackles the eco-conscious, on-the-go wine lover with its “retro-cool” PaperBoy brand, a line of appellation-based, super-premium wines in a paper wine bottle—a first for the U.S.

“Truett-Hurst is always looking to respond to the reasons why people buy wine,” says company CEO Phil Hurst. “An eco-responsible package was an obvious addition to our line of brands that appeal to lifestyle choices.”

Introduced with limited exclusivity by Safeway in September 2013 and now in general distribution in 45 states, PaperBoy is packaged in a molded paper outer shell in the shape of a traditional wine bottle, with a plastic liner inside. The concept was brought to Truett-Hurst by designer Kevin Shaw of Stranger & Stranger, and is supplied by U.K.-based GreenBottle.

Changing consumer mindsets
As Hurst explains, his company is on a quest through new products and packaging to change the way people think about and buy wine. For eco-conscious consumers on the move, the lightweight PaperBoy package provides a responsible way for them to carry wine outdoors. “Campers, hikers, and fishermen can carry this lightweight package—only 1.9 pounds filled—and enjoy premium wine from a 750-mL bottle almost anywhere, collapsing it when finished for return to a recycling site,” he says.

Two introductory PaperBoy varieties have been crafted by Virginia Marie Lambrix, winemaker for VML and Truett-Hurst wineries: a 2012 Paso Robles Red Blend ($14.99) and a 2012 Mendocino Chardonnay ($13.99). “We at Truett-Hurst believe that if the quality of the wine exceeds a customer’s expectation, then new, cutting-edge packaging will become more mainstream,” Lambrix says.

As mentioned, designer Kevin Shaw, who worked with Truett-Hurst on the Evocative Wrapped Bottle line in 2012, initially brought the concept of GreenBottle to the attention of Truett-Hurst. Hurst says at the time, his company was looking for ways to meet retailer and consumer demands for innovative new wine technologies and eco-friendly products.

While Shaw designed the branding art and contributed the “PaperBoy” name, GreenBottle engineered the wine bottle structure. Truett-Hurst’s directives for the structure were that it needed to convey “wine,” and it had to be able to run down their existing packaging line.

Have questions about  the savings in weight vs the non- recyclability of the plastic bladder?

As Hurst explains, one cross-country truck of PaperBoy wine, traveling 2,800 miles, saves approximately 61 gal of diesel fuel, with 1,365 lb less CO2 added to the atmosphere. “If all wine shipped annually in the U.S. [207.7 million cases] was packaged in the PaperBoy bottle, approximate savings of 50,793,750 gallons of diesel and 560,000 tons of CO2 would be realized,” he says.

In total, the carbon footprint for the PaperBoy bottle versus glass is 67% smaller, while the carbon footprint for shipping is 18% more efficient than glass.

As a winemaker, Lambrix says she admires the practicality of PaperBoy. “Wines that will be consumed almost immediately do not need a heavy, environmentally and economically expensive glass bottle and cork,” she says. “We would rather apply the savings that PaperBoy affords toward more expensive, better-crafted wine so that both the customer and the environment win.”

PaperBoy wine – thinking outside the box and creating a really cool eco friendly package!

 


Do I need a pocket folder, a presentation binder or a 3-ring binder?

How do you decide between a pocket folder, presentation binder or a 3-ring binder?

First off I am going to assume that you know what each of these items are.  (if not, scoot down to the bottom of the post – just don’t tell anyone)

Time to talk to yourself.  If you can answer these questions, it will make your choice easier:

  1. How much paper needs to be put into my presentation?
  2. Are there a lot of variable sheets that get used a lot?
  3. Do I need the paper to be secured (i.e. not fall out ever)?
  4. How long does the marketing material need to last?
  5. Is this resource heavily used?
  6. Do I need shelf presence (does it need make itself known on a bookshelf)?

Get a 3-ring Binder -

if over 220 sheets of paper, it needs to last and or is heavily used.

The more paper you need to use and the more heavily used your information is, I would suggest a 3-ring binder.  The heavier board means it will stand up to abuse better and keep looking great. And also, the weight of all that paper risks pulling a rivet out of a presentation binder.

These are great for proposals – especially in Engineering and Construction – interior design, sample kits, car companies, and a lot of other uses.  Also ideal for conferences and important meetings. Added bonus of branding for quality, sturdiness and design possibilities.

Get a Presentation Binder -

if under 220 sheets of paper, paper needs to be locked in and/or there is some variable paper (presentation binders have pockets too!)

Presentation binders straddle the hardback 3-ring binder and a pocket folder in that they have pockets and a ring.  The paperboard is not as sturdy as a 3-ring binder, so if it is going to be heavily used over a longer period of time – consider going to the 3-ring binder.

Many healthcare information packets use presentation binders for a few reasons: It only gets heavy use for a limited period of time, pockets allow extra information to be easily stored and the rings hold the important information in place.

Get a Pocket Folder -

if you have a smaller amount of paper that may need to be accessed out of order.

Sometimes a pocket folder is the ideal thing.  Great branding possibilities, easy to cary and organizes all of your papers in a flash.

We have seen a lot of these in healthcare and financial information packets, and for anything that just needs to hold less, but important, paper.

 

Definitions!

Pocket Folders

eco friendly Two_Pocket_Folder - Naked BinderPrinted or plain 18pt or 22pt paper with pockets that is folded so the pockets are on the inside. Usually with 1 or 2 pockets that can be horizontal or vertical.  All this brings a huge amount of variations of pocket styles, capacity pockets…

 

 

 

Presentation Binder:

presentation binders - paperboard binders - Corporate ImagePrinted or plain 18pt or 22pt paperboard with or without pockets, folded with a spine that holds a 3-ring mechanism.  Sort of a hybrid between a pocket folder and a binder.

 

 

 

3-ring Binder

custom eco friendly 3-ring binders - Corporate ImageA heavy recycled board (in our case 94pt to 110pt and 100% post consumer waste) that can be bare, wrapped in cloth or printed paper sheets with a 3-ring mechanism to hold various amounts of paper. We case and line our binders like a hardcover book. Why?  So they are the strongest 3-ring binders in the world.


Using a 3-Ring Binder Template #2: Common Errors – Bleeds

So you have your 3-ring binder template and you are ready to create a masterpiece of art and branding that will make your client go crazy with happiness.

So where should you pull those bleeds out to?

What are bleeds in printing?  Let us refer to Wikipedia:

Bleed is a printing term that refers to printing that goes beyond the edge of the sheet before trimming. In other words, the bleed is the area to be trimmed off. The bleed is the part on the side of a document that gives the printer a small amount of space to account for movement of the paper, and design inconsistencies. Artwork and background colors can extend into the bleed area. After trimming, the bleed ensures that no unprinted edges occur in the final trimmed document.

It is very difficult to print exactly to the edge of a sheet of paper/card so, to achieve this, it is necessary to print a slightly larger area than is needed and then trim the paper/card down to the required finished size. Images, background images and fills which are intended to extend to the edge of the page must be extended beyond the trim line to give a bleed.[1]

Bleeds in the USA generally are 1/8 of an inch from where the cut is to be made. Bleeds in the UK and Europe generally are 2 to 5mm from where the cut is to be made. This can vary from one print company to another. Some printers ask for specific sizes; most of these companies place the specific demands on their website or offer templates that are already set to their required bleed settings.

Make sense?  Manufacturing and printing is amazingly exact, but there are tolerances.  The 1/8″ bleed allows for slight inconsistencies in printing, trimming, casing and lining your 3-ring binder to insure your art looks great.

If you are used to designing for the internet, consider this like the differences in how browsers read your code.  You have to adjust for that too.

Here is what you will see.  For simplicity, we are working on a 3-ring binder liner template. In example one, the art is pulled up to the cut line for the edge of the binder.  If there is the tiniest variation anywhere in the process, you may get a small white strip on the right side of your liner. Blah. Click the pictures to see them larger.

Designing your 3-ring binder - using full bleeds - Corporate Image

If you pull your image out to the 1/8″ bleed line – all is good and your 3-ring binder liner will always look good.

Correct-bleeds-for-binder-template---Corporate-Image

 

Paying attention to your bleeds when working on a custom 3-ring binder or pocket folder will not only make your client happy, but also you (not rushing around to redo the art) and your manufacturer (us!).

Spread happiness. Pay attention to bleeds!

In case you are wondering, the photo is from the Des Moines Pappajohn Sculpture Garden which is rather amazing.

Yoshitomo Nara (Japanese, born 1959)
White Ghost, 2010 (detail)
Painted stainless steel and fiberglass
12 x 12 feet
Des Moines Art Center Permanent Collections


Custom 3-ring Binders should be recyclable, recycled and eco friendly

Your company marketing materials, including your 3-ring binders,  should match your quality, strength, look and values.

Amazing notebook binders, Corporate Image

Our Materials

Corporate Image offers you the best quality 3-ring binders from printing, craftsmanship while also creating an eco friendly binder that is 100% recyclable.  We start with FSC certified 100% post consumer waste board, print with soy inks on FSC certified papers and produce binders that are 100% recyclable.

Why get a recyclable binder?

There are many reasons.

Better Marketing Materials.  

With superior offset and digital printing, stronger construction and great craftsmanship, the 3-ring binder you get from Corporate Image looks better, works better and lasts longer. It is a clear statement of your company values and who you are.

Your environment.

You and your company believe that we all need to do more to protect the environment.  Each small step towards reducing toxics in our offices and landfills add up.

Vinyl binders are toxic – from creating the vinyl and binder, to off-gassing on the shelf to creating issues in landfill.  The vinyl is not recyclable anywhere in the US at this point. With so many being made still, this is an issue for landfill operators especially if there are fires (about 9000 landfill fires a year in the US)

Save money.

Many corporations are pushing to go greener because it saves  money. One of our binders will last longer and look better – meaning that your marketing materials are in great shape in your clients hands for longer. If you need to dispose of the binders, ours are 100% recyclable meaning no toxic waste permits which you need for large amounts of vinyl binders.

Corporate Image believes that your custom 3-ring binders can be more than a way to store paper.  We see them as a branding tool, a marketing presentation piece that sets you apart from the rest.  From the craftsmanship we put in at our midwestern production plant to the eco-friendly recycled binder materials, we give you a 3-ring binder that aligns with your values.


American Package Design Awards

Corporate Image is proud to announce that three of our clients have won 2014 American Package Design Awards

Congratulations to Prestige Tuxedo, HealthPartners and Meyocks Group / Delta Dental of Iowa!

Award winning 3-ring binder and corrugated box - Corporate Image

Award winning Marketing kit - Corporate ImageAward winning spiral bound binder - Corporate Image

Learn More Here

 


Using a 3-Ring Binder Template #1: Common Errors

Whether you are designing your first 3-ring binder or your 500th, there are a few common errors to watch out for.

3-ring binder template - How to avoid mistakes

 

So here you are with you binder template, ready to start making your art and getting creative on that custom binder. Today we are going to look at three things to watch for that often trip people up.

1. Spine Text : how it reads.

2. Spine Text: Keeping it out of the hinges

3. Rivets: avoiding having a hole in your artwork

Lets see an example:

 

Using a 3-ring binder template

 

Who doesn’t love flying children?  And one of them is mine, so I think this would make a fine binder.

Reading Spine Text: First of all in the U.S., when you read spine text your head tilts to your right.  In Europe, your head tilts to the left.  As your fine manufacturer of binders, we don’t know who your audience is, so we may not question your choice in that but your client might.

Positioning Spine Text: The beginning and end of the spine also includes the hinge, which is pressed into the board.  This is a bad place to have small text as it can be somewhat lost in the flex.  Allow 3/8th to 1/2″ from the end of those lines on the template to insure the safety of your text.

Images that stretch through the hinge look great, color blocks – anything like that – but small text can be hard to read.

Avoiding the rivets: I dropped the rivets out to insure they were more visible, I would not do that in the final artwork. Common errors are when the text on the bottom of the page has a rivet in it or an image has a hole in it.

Using 3-ring binder templates - watching for rivetsSince this image is of my son, I don’t want that rivet too near his head. Generally, he is a good kid.

How this comes up is that the image that you lay down masks the template.  Rivets are easy to forget about if you are not doing this all the time. To solve this problem, go to layers when you are building your art and screen back your art until the template shows more strongly.  Check to insure those rivet are not in awkward places.

Alternately, you can do what I did and fill them (leaving the template layer on top) with a very contrasting color so you just can’t forget them. Since the fill is part of the template, you don’t have to worry about seeing that in your artwork later.

 

 

We will keep our series on Using a 3-Ring Binder Template going to cover a few more common errors. Keep an eye out!


Facebook Twitter LinkedIn RSS

Categories

Subscribe

[subscribe2]
enter email address to stay connected